Living Wall Research

Sheffield Living Wall Research Project

Living Walls Research and Development 

Thermal Benefits of  Living Walls

Scotscape’s commitment to building a sustainable and green future is demonstrated via our continued investment into research and development of living wall systems.

Our projects include a study into the thermal benefits of living walls, carried out during a year long study at the University of Sheffield.  Our test bed produced strong evidence proving both the insulation and cooling properties of living walls.  We learnt that using living walls as a method to retrofit existing property assets are hugely valuable – keeping indoor temperatures more static throughout the summer and winter months – reducing energy costs for both heating and cooling buildings.  This project has led us to develop our unique living wall system which embraces what has been learnt and enables architects and sustainability specialists to fully quantify how living walls affect the ‘u’ value of a building.

Click here to download more information about this research project
Cambridge University Botanic Garden uses living wall technology

Plant Power: Creating Electricity with Living Walls

Another fascinating project sponsored by Scotscape is based at the Botanic Gardens in Cambridge.  The P2P hub is the brainchild of researchers at the biochemistry department at the University of Cambridge’s Downing College.  The ‘hub’ uses the Scotscape living wall system with an additional layer of carbon fibre to enable the electricity created by growing plants to be harnessed, this ground breaking project combines our living wall system with solar panels to further enhance the potential of this inspired concept.

Bug Life Wall

Biodiverse Living Walls: Research with Bug Life

Scotscape has also invested in a ‘training wall’ at our premises in Surbiton, where we carry out our training days for garden designers, architects and contractors.  It also enables us to carry out tests on species mixes, drought resistant planting and water use.  Our current project in conjunction with the charity Bug Life is a ‘pollinator wall’.  This will create the optimum planting plan for a living wall to attract bees and invertebrates back into the city, which is crucial in areas where natural biodiversity has been removed through building.

Cities Alive: Green Building Envelope

Can retrofitting cityscapes with vegetation improve the health and well-being of urban citizens? Can we use green facades to capture renewable energy and drive sustainability?

Experts from eight Arup skill networks across the globe cross-examine these questions with a view to shape better cities. The comprehensive research considers whether green building envelopes can have a special role to play in improving our cities for their inhabitants.